Posts Tagged ‘season’


Review: Back to the Future Season 2 and OUTATIME

July 30, 2011

And so we come to the end of this long month of Back to the Future,  and I can honestly say I’m glad. I have a great love of Back to the Future, but even something you love can get can get tiring after five straight weeks. I never thought it would happen, but I think I’m actually done with Back to the Future for a while. So, without further ado, here it is.

Season two of the animated series is very similar to the first season. In fact, the base format is the same: short intro from Christopher Lloyd, the cartoon itself, and Christopher Lloyd and Bill Nye doing science. The two biggest changes are the opening sequence, which now has clips from the first season of the show, and the experiments done at the end of the show, which take a more dangerous turn. The first episode’s experiment is making a cannon out of a two liter bottle, vinegar, baking soda, and a cork. I’d like to point out that if you put the cork on too tight, it stops being a cannon and starts being a bomb. This is only two ingredients different from a dry ice bomb.

Or the second episode’s experiment, which involves using a ball of clay, a baseball, and some string to simulate gravity, and possibly break a neighbor’s window or a sibling’s teeth. I’m starting to think this may be why the show got canceled. Hitting your sister in the face with a baseball is considered by most parents groups to be a bad thing. Not that I’ve had any first hand experience or anything…

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Review: Back to the Future Season 1 and Episode IV

July 24, 2011

I, like many people, was completely unaware that there was a Back to the Future cartoon, but there were two seasons on CBS in the early nineties. And I’m going to look at both of them for you. This is Season 1 and Episode IV: Double Visions.

Like all cartoons in the early nineties, Back to the Future: The Animated Series incorporated educational elements in with the core cartoon. Unlike all other cartoons, these educational segments contained the powerful one-two punch of Christopher Lloyd, reprising his role as Doc Brown, and Bill Nye, who actually conducted these mini-experiments. These experiments, on things like creating a small electromagnet from a nail or making a lemon battery, or lessons on water pressure or drag, are safe enough to preform at home that the viewers would immediate wake the nearest sleeping parent to ask them for help.

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